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Author Topic: Johns Hopkins Faculty  (Read 16358 times)

Admissions_Daniel

  • Administrator
  • Ask Me a Question!
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« on: July 21, 2007, 07:32 AM »
When applying to colleges students often overlook professors, one of the most important parts of any university. These are the people who will teach you and who will have the most impact on your education. Johns Hopkins professors are at the top of their respective fields but many prospective students are not aware of the resources that these teachers offer.

To help, we have created this discussion thread about professors at Hopkins. The various current Hopkins students will provide personal comments about the faculty at Hopkins and even share anecdotes about their favorite professors.

We also suggest that you feel free to ask the current students and staff about their favorite professors, great departments, or how the professors are in your specific
area of interest.

And finally, here are some web links you may find useful to learn more about Hopkins faculty:

Links to Undergraduate Department pages:
http://apply.jhu.edu/academics/majors.html
(Many department pages contain faculty profiles and even contact information for faculty members.)

Faculty Homepages: http://webapps.jhu.edu/jhuniverse/faculty_...pages/index.cfm

Faculty Accolades:
Nobel Prize winners: http://webapps.jhu.edu/jhuniverse/informat...nners/index.cfm
Books by Hopkins Faculty: http://webapps.jhu.edu/jhuniverse/informat...culty/index.cfm
Research Highlights: http://webapps.jhu.edu/jhuniverse/informat...ights/index.cfm

JHU_Phil

  • Hopkins Student
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2007, 12:48 PM »
Ahh the professors...

Like farmers, Hopkins Professors are outstanding in their fields, and one can be assured that they are included on very important projects and research. When I took Physics, my professor is in charge of running the Hubble Space Telescope. One day he came in to announce that he would not be in tomorrow because he had better things to do...I believed him. Rather than be insulted, I thought, "wow, what a bro."

I give a few tours and the question that comes up EVERY time is the accessibility of the professors. Again, like at any other school, it is difficult to make a statement about an entire faculty. For example, that same physics professor probably wouldn't meet with me in a eon, but he has set up his class such that he doesn't have to and I can meet with a veritable army of TAs. He also set up DAILY review sessions.

On the other hand my Biochemistry Professor would take as much time as reasonably possible to talk about topics in and out of the classroom. I went in to talk to him about grad school and these sorts of things.

My Orgo Lab professor was one of the better teachers I have ever had. She made sure that she used visuals, and verbal lecture effectively and was always consistent with her availability of information. There were two lab write up necessary for the class and she stayed at her office till nearly midnight reading over anyone's lab who came to the door. Amazing.


But on the prowess of the professors themselves. My Chinese History prof was very fond of telling the story about how he was offered a position at an Ivy school and it was one of the happiest moments of his life turning it down. He had great stories about going to China in the 60 and 70s to do research and the friendliness of the Communists, etc. Great great stories.

My Public Health professors are incredible especially the guest lectures. My Medical sociology professor is a congressional expert on psychological illness in the US. I met Dr. Naverro who was Hillary Clinton's health policy expert in the early 90's. The former head of the National Health Statistics Center. The World's leading water expert, DR. Kellogg taught me all about water sanitation and security. After September eleventh, the Bloomberg School of Public Health had to take over for the EPA to monitor the pollution levels from the debris because we were the only ones with the correct tools.

My recommendation is to take college courses in high school to get out of the intro classes and take the higher level courses with smaller class size to meet these professors. Incredible people, some are better teachers than others, but it's cool when you see them interviewed on the History Channel.

"Hey! Dr. Mooney!" As he talks about the possible demise of humanity through biological agents.
Phil C. '08
"So long, and thanks for all the fish."
(read my blog)

JHU_Liny

  • Hopkins Student
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2007, 05:10 PM »
i have to say, out of all the professors, Dr. David Klein, my Organic Chem I and II professor had to be by far my favorite

true, being a BME student, i've had some of the top biomedical engineers teach my BME classes...engineers who have published absolutely wonderful research papers and are some of the pioneers of the field, but Dr. Klein was hands down the best professor I've had...he took a topic that is dreaded by every single pre-med student in the nation, and made it easy!  by even writing his own "second language" workbook, i feel like he gave us the stepping stones to really understand the material!  compared to my pre-med friends in other schools, i felt like i had so much of a better understanding of orgo! and on top of that he made class fun too, telling us great anecdotes...he even promised us he'd sing the really long animaniacs song about ALL the countries if we did well on our second exam...sure enough we did, and sure enough klein stood on top of the table and sang the 5min. song out loud verbatim without one mistake

now, while I'm studying for MCAT's and reading the notes for orgo by princeton review and kaplan i realize how happy i am i took orgo with klein! processing the various reactions and reagents, etc. would be so much more difficult without his wonderful teaching!!

you'll find a lot of teachers like that here...teachers who are an absolute pleasure to be taught by while at the same time being absolute geniuses lol! when you hear them talk about the work they do outside the classroom (phil gives some great examples above) you'll just listen in amazement!
Liny
Class of 2009
My Guest Blog - Diwali
"Some people are too tired to give you a smile. Give them one of yours, as none needs a smile so much as he who has no more to give" :-)

JHU_Kate

  • Hopkins Alumni
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2007, 12:02 AM »
In alphabetical order:

1. Dr. Gregory Ball: He's a professor of the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences who taught "Introduction to Psychology" in the spring of my freshman year. (By the way, I've observed that not the same professor teaches that course each semester.) I liked him because he didn't lecture just by reading prepared notes or slides of a PowerPoint presentation; instead, he often spoke directly to the class (referring to his PowerPoint presentations every now and then to reiterate his point) in a very loud and clear voice. Plus, his lectures were always entertaining and informative at the same time. Based on my two semesters (and one summer) of taking college courses so far, he's the best lecturer I've had. (FYI, there's also a Dr. Laurence Ball who's a professor of the Department of Economics.)

2. Dr. Robert Horner: He's a professor of the Department of Biology who taught Freshman Seminar: Tuberculosis in the fall of my freshman year. I enjoyed how Dr. Horner kept the seminar very light-hearted and entertaining. Plus, he did a pretty good job explaining to thirteen college freshmen--with varying high school biology backgrounds--chapters from a medical textbook on the immune system, as well as research papers on Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

3. Dr. Andrew Talle: He's a professor of the Peabody Conservatory who taught "Introduction to Western Classical Music" here at the Homewood campus in the fall of my freshman year. I liked him because while his lectures seemed dry if you didn't listen closely to them, he inserted many wry jokes every so often. Plus, he had relatively flexible course requirements--he tried to make it a point that he was there to help you appreciate classical music more than anything.
JHU_Kate
Class of 2010
Neuroscience Major
Classics Minor
Senior Arts Certificate Candidate in Dance

http://blogs.hopkins-interactive.com/kate

JHU_Tanmay

  • Full Member
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2007, 12:17 AM »
Top three professors (in no particular order)

1. Dr Klein (Orgo I) - he's not teaching at Hopkins during the year (he's taking a sabbatical for a few years to write a textbook, but still teaching in the summers), but he made Orgo, which is normally an impossible class, manageable. Yeah, it was still tough, but the things he did to teach the material (and which he had refined through years of teaching) made the class interesting and comprehensible.

2. Dr. Stebe (Transport I) - Dr. Stebe's the chair of the ChemBE department and I had her for Transport I this spring. Her class was really interesting and engaging even though the material is kind of dense. The Navier-Stokes Equation isn't the most enthralling thing to learn about but the way Dr. Stebe taught, with her random examples and stories about her family, made Transport one of my favorite classes

3. Dr. Hendry (Functional Human Neuroanatomy) - I signed up for Dr. Hendry's class kind of randomly - it looked interesting, I needed a bio-type class, and my friend was TA'ing it - but I'm really glad I did. Dr. Hendry did an amazing job presenting a really cool subject. He managed to go through a lot of detail while still keeping the material understandable. Plus, his teaching style and the fact that he knew almost everyone in the class's name was really cool

JHU_Adam

  • Hopkins Student
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #5 on: July 24, 2007, 12:35 PM »
I've had two outstanding teachers since i've been at hopkins:

1. Professor Cohn:  She was my expository writing professor.  Class with her consisted of the 12 people in class simply having a conversation.  We would be assigned a reading assignment over the weekend and then the whole week would be spent discussing what we read.  She did not take a dominating force in the discussion but merely got involved as though she was another student (who just really knew her stuff).  She moderated the discussion and then ended the class with an over-arching theme.  Other classes where spent on writing technique and the structuring of arguments.  She always met with students individually to go over their work.

2.  Professor Klein:  As Tanmay described, Professor Klein took the daunting class of Organic Chemistry and made it enjoyable.  I have him right now over the summer.  He's absolutely amazing.  You can tell that he really cares and wants to make sure that everyone in the class understands whats going on and has no problem stopping to explain things 2x over
"Am I insane? Or am I SO SANE that I JUST BLEW YOUR MIND!"

Orin

  • Newbie
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #6 on: July 25, 2007, 08:30 PM »
WOW Dr. Klein seems like the most amazing professor. From all the people that i know who took organic Chem, they told me Organic Chem was the hardest class.
what is it about Dr. Klein that made his classes so interesting? did he lecture or was he like a lab teacher. How big was Dr.Klein's class....was he interactive with students?

would be very thankful if answer my questions

JHU_MichelleT

  • Hopkins Alumni
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #7 on: July 25, 2007, 10:05 PM »
I had a ton of fantastic professors over the past four years...it's crazy to think about the number of hours I spent with some of them (multiple classes over multiple semesters, in lab, etc)! I have really fond memories of almost all of my professors, and Phil's right that pretty much every professor you'll have at Hopkins is top notch in their field (my cog sci professor was awarded the equivalent of his field's Nobel last year - so cool! - and yet he is still down to earth, says Hi in the hallway, and suggested that we have class outside. often.).

Some of my favorites:
* Paul Smolensky (cognitive science) as mentioned above. Brilliant, but able to bring his content down to an understandable level without "dumbing it down" to the point where it didn't mean anything substantial - I learned SO much, without really feeling like I was trying hard. Instead, it just seemed interesting, and I wanted to keep reading more and more.

* Stefanie DeLuca (sociology) and Steve Plank (sociology) - two young professors hired relatively recently, with great drive & motivation to teach about their passion - sociology of education. Really inspiring, great advisers, and willing to sit and chat about current events in the field, future plans, or interesting articles from the news. Happy to meet at Starbucks, too - always a plus!

* Barksdale Maynard (art history) - yeah, it's a weird name, but he's really that cool. "Landed southern gentry turned Delaware architecture aficionado" is probably the best way to describe him. Encyclopedic knowledge, great slides, funny anecdotes about everything and everyone; generally interested in making sure that students got a lot out of his class. He would always encourage students to check in with him about their paper topics and would help with outlines, sources, etc.

* Qiao Zhang (math). Absolutely a dream. Wrote PERSONAL comments on 200+ calc II students' tests, commenting on what they did well and their areas to focus on in the future. Does problems in class & gives you time to try it on your own, so that you can see whether you got the hang of it or need to go home and review. Made me want to go to early morning math - I didn't think that was possible.

* Stewart Hendry (neuro). Michelle B. & Tanmay love him for good reason; he's funny & explains complicated things in easy ways. His on-board diagrams can get crazy, but they somehow seem easy to follow no matter what. Focuses on both details and the big picture, to make sure that even when you forget specifics, you'll still know why you should care in the first place.

* Larry Raifman (psych). Adjunct (part-time) professor trained as a lawyer and PhD in psych. Teaches fascinating classes on Law & Psych and Behavioral Finance. Tells good stories, always has something relevant to talk about from his work that day. Showed me how you can mix disciplines across traditional boundaries and find a place/job that's right for you.
Check out my archived student blog from when I was a student:here!

You can also read my guest blog entries: here, here, and here.

JHU_Esther

  • Hopkins Alumni
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2007, 02:12 PM »
Whenever I get a question about professors I always point to Professor Duedney. He taught me Global Security Politics my freshman year and to this date it has remained one of my favorites classes. Duedney is one of the prime examples of how a 300 person lecture can be better than a 20 person section. Every day I would walk out of class and think that maybe the world was going to end tomorrow because of all the scary nuclear weapons out there. It never did but Deudney certainly gave me a lot to think about. I liked Professor Deudney so much that I selected him for my advisor and also might write a thesis on Global Security Politics. Also my favorite fun fact about Professor Deudney is that he is about 7 ft tall, wears all back (fedora too), and has fingers that look like tentacles. He's a truely a great professor.
Name Esther B.
Class 2009
Adventures at Hopkins

JHU_Julia

  • Hopkins Alumni
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #9 on: July 26, 2007, 10:27 PM »
Like others have said, it's really hard to make a general statement about the entire faculty--it really depends on the individual teacher's style.  Some are more accessible than others but a lot of it is up to you--if you want to meet with a professor, you definitely can. It's just a matter of pursuing them yourself.  

First, I second Phil's love of Professor Rowe (Chinese history).  He told our class some great stories. Most of what I learned was from his own anecdotes and recollections of his many trips to China.  I have never had a professor who cared so much about his or her field.  He speaks Chinese fluently and knows almost all of the scholarly work that has been written about China.

Second is another history professor Melanie Shell-Weiss.  Professor Shell-Weiss is definitely the most well spoken professor I've ever had.  Her lectures for a course on the history of immigration were amazingly clear and she really inspires interest in the subjects she teaches.  I recommended that a friend take a class of her's last spring and she also loved Shell-Weiss.

As far as political science professors, I have three favorites (sorry, but it is my major!) The first and obvious choice is Professor Deudney who Esther wrote about.  I can't really explain the Deudney experience--take International Politics and then you will understand.  Second, is Professor Ginsburg who teaches Intro to American Politics and runs the Aitchison DC Study Program which I will be doing in the fall.  His teaching style is very anecdotal and he's really fun to listen to.  Third, is Professor Blyth who taught Comparative Politics last year.  His specialty is in comparative economics which was definitely a little complicated but he was a great teacher.
~Julia~
Hopkins Class of 2009
Check out my blog here! Julia's Journal

JHU_Phil

  • Hopkins Student
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #10 on: July 27, 2007, 09:23 AM »
I also had Dr. Klein.

Why he is so amazing is how he presents his class on the first day:

If I were to give you a 100 page script of a 2 hour movie and told you to memorize it in 10 hours, you would be at a loss. However, sit down and watch the 2 hour movie 5 times, and by the end you would know nearly the entire movie by heart.

That is how he teaches Orgo. He has written books specifically to make the subject more accessible to undergrads. You can buy them on anywhere: Organic Chemistry as a Second Language.
Phil C. '08
"So long, and thanks for all the fish."
(read my blog)

JHU_Andrew

  • Hopkins Alumni
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #11 on: July 27, 2007, 11:20 AM »
I hate to cop out and not think of something different/original, but whatever... I'm going to have to agree with everyone about Professor Deudney. He taught my International Politics class last fall and was AMAZING. IR theory can be extremely complicated and abstract at times, but Professor Deudney made every lecture enjoyable, clear, and worth attending. His love for both political science and teaching in general are obvious-- all you have to do is sit in on one of his lectures to realize it. Professor Deudney's sense of humor is also another reason why students love him so much. What other teacher would make a reference to Borat during a lecture...?

I'm definitely lucky he's my advisor.
ANDREW
JHU 2009

Click here to check out the Senior Blog.

JHU_Stefanie

  • Hopkins Student
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #12 on: July 27, 2007, 03:46 PM »
I have three favorite professors at Hopkins, but they fall into two different categories.

1. Professor Schroer and Professor Wendland:  It was so wonderful to have these brilliant female professors last spring.  Dr. Schroer is known for her scientific discoveries (look up her research concerning dynactin).  She is a wonderful lecturer because she is so in tune with her audience.  For students in Cell Biology, she really breaks down the information in coherent terms.  She is actually known across campus for this attribute.  Dr. W is wonderful because she brings such a caring/motherly aspect to teaching in a top-notch institution.  She's someone who will get to know you in a class of 200.  Also, they're both message board fanatics and will help you on a daily basis (go WebCT).

2. Professor Blake of IFP I.  He has definitely shaped my worldview simply by sharing lessons of his life and his observations.  He also is someone who will seek you out on campus to simply say 'hello'.  He embodies such a love for undergraduates at Hopkins (he was also an undergraduate here years and years ago).  His class is a great source of inspiration for writing and other areas simply because of who he is (not just on an academic level).

JHU_Jackie

  • Hopkins Alumni
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #13 on: July 30, 2007, 03:16 PM »
I loved having Qiao Zhang as a professor, his enthusiasm was addictive and you could tell her really wanted you to understand the concepts.  As Michelle said above he wrote personal comments on everyones midterms and finals and that is seriously a lot of writing.

I also loved my Shakespeare Class which was taught by Professor Halpern.  He presented both unique and commmon theories about different Shakespeare plays and proceeded to prove them with evidence from the text.  I also thought he emphasized the important things with clips from BBC productions of the plays.  You can tell he really knew what he was talking about and the lectures were fascinating.
Jackie M.
Class of 2010
Philosophy
Read My Blog: Murphy's Law Gone Right

JHU_Blake

  • Hopkins Student
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #14 on: July 31, 2007, 05:45 PM »
Qiao Zhang: Great professor. I had Calc I with Jackie... though I do not love math, Zhang still made it interesting, and like others said, he took the time to comment on everyone's tests. I didn't have much to compare him to during my first semester, but after 2 semesters and 2 summer terms I rank him at the top of my list.

Sameena Mulla: I've written about her; extremely knowledgeable, personable, and accessible. All instructors do not make themselves accessible to their students. I took her class in the spring and took another one this summer. Luckily, I can take courses from various disciplines in my major. (Yet another public health plug)

JHU_MichelleB

  • Hopkins Alumni
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #15 on: August 02, 2007, 10:45 AM »
I’ve had a wide variety of professors at Hopkins, and while there was the occasional complete disaster of a professor (*cough* my Chem II professor *cough*), I can assure you those are few and far between. Most of my professors have been great, and never have I taken a class where I felt like I couldn’t get personal attention if I needed it (either in class when the professor stopped during lecture to field questions, or after class at office hours/TA help hours)

Some of my professors stand out in my mind for being particularly awesome. They include:

Dr Sprenkle- His Music History II class taught at Peabody was fabulous. He has been doing this for a while and knows exactly how to structure a lecture: with a great mix of listening, theory, and history lesson all mixed in. You’d just walk in to class, he’d say really interesting things about music, and then before you knew it you were done. The best thing we did in that class was our 3-week analysis of Bach’s B Minor Mass. Instead of trying to cover all of Bach and only getting a passing familiarity with a TON of works, we studied one of his masterpieces seriously in-depth. I just emailed him a few days ago and he gave me permission to sign up for his graduate seminar on Bach’s Passions- his specific wording in his reply was “Sure- the more the merrier”. Sprenkle has one of those classes that seriously be recorded and turned into a PBS documentary. He’s great.

James Glossman- His directing seminar class was so personal and involved. My class only had 8 people in it, and we were able to choose our own selections for which scene we wanted to direct. Then, we’d all have sessions in class where we’d bring our actors in and run scenes, and everyone in class would comment and Jim would give us suggestions on how to better perfect our scene. He was always such a straight shooter and was always so helpful telling you things you needed to fix and always complementary of things you did well. An amazing teacher.

Krista Smith- Words cannot describe how amazing Krista was to work with. She was the professor of our Peformance class and the director of the play we put on through the class- The Marriage of Bette and Boo. She cast the play within the first week of school and we got to go through an extremely thorough study of our characters and build an immense sense of trust with our fellow actors. The thing that made Krista so amazing was her unending willingness to respond to any concern that anyone had, and work one-on-one with each student for discussions about not only their role but anything else going on in their life as well. She got the entire cast free tickets to go see her show in NY that she had directed. Just phenomenal.

Hendry- The best science professor I’ve ever had here. Dr. Hendry’s lectures are always so clear and interesting, and he always makes sure that students know what he’s talking about. He’s always willing to answer student questions in class and stops frequently in lecture to allow for questions. He always makes himself available to students who are struggling or just have questions, and he personally tracks each student and targets the ones who seem to have trouble with the subject matter to call them to office hours and help them out. Plus, he’s an absolutely brilliant neuroscientist.

So, I could go on about even more professors but this post is becoming really long. Shout-outs include Dr. Grossman, my Constitutional Law professor, Dr. Hatter, my Cell/Molec neuro professor, and Professor Maura Tumulty, my analytic philosophy professor.

JHU_Juinting

  • Hopkins Student
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #16 on: August 08, 2007, 10:54 PM »
So I kinda just give some credit to all the TAs. They're pretty good for whenever the professor is unavailable, and they can help make or break a class.

Personal favorite professor that hasn't been mentioned...Shoukas in the BME of you may have met him during an open house, but when he teaches, he gets the point across very effectively.
My seventh birthday;
I weep at Barbie's Dream House.
How could you not know?

JHU_Kate

  • Hopkins Alumni
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #17 on: October 20, 2007, 05:45 PM »
Now that I'm a month and a half into my sophomore year, I want to mention a few more professors:

1. Dr. Stewart Hendry: He's a professor of the Undergraduate Program in Neuroscience; this semester, he's one of three professors who are co-teaching the "Nervous System I" course that I'm taking. I agree with Michelle B. and Tanmay (you can read what they've had to say about Dr. Hendry in earlier posts on this discussion thread) that he's an excellent lecturer and remembers students' names and faces really well.

2. Dr. Samer Hattar: He's a professor of both the Department of Biology and the Undergraduate Program in Neuroscience. Like Dr. Hendry, I have him as one of the three professors who teach "The Nervous System." I don't think he explains concepts in lectures as well as Dr. Hendry, but he's still good at trying to do his best to help you understand concepts. He's also a friendly individual, and it's not unusual to see him biking around campus or exercising at the rec center and greeting his former and current students.

3. Dr. Michael Koortbojian. He's a professor of both the Department of Classics and the Department of the History of Art. This semester, he's teaching the "Art in the Age of Augustus" course that I'm taking. He's yet another professor who makes things sound simple, but instead of discussing the nervous system, he talks about ancient Greco-Roman art. His lectures consist of him showing slides of various works of art and him pointing out their symbolism, and he'd sometimes pause to ask questions to make us figure out the symbolism in other works of art ourselves. He's also a relatively unconventional professor in the sense that he provides no syllabus; his reasoning is that we're adults, and he shouldn't be telling us how to study for his course.
JHU_Kate
Class of 2010
Neuroscience Major
Classics Minor
Senior Arts Certificate Candidate in Dance

http://blogs.hopkins-interactive.com/kate

JHU_Kate

  • Hopkins Alumni
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #18 on: October 20, 2007, 05:56 PM »
Now, here's for a cute professor-related anecdote! While I was walking from Mason Hall (the new admissions building on campus--come to Hopkins and check it out if you haven't already) to Levering Hall to buy lunch yesterday, and I ran into Dr. Elizabeth Patton. She's a visiting professor in the Humanities Center who's one of four professors in "Great Books: The Western Tradition" (another course that I'm taking this semester), and she's the professor assigned to lead my discussion section in "Great Books." Her daughter and son were with her. She stopped me to say hi and introduced me to her children. Since I remembered how she mentioned her daughter a few times in my discussion section, I asked her, "Didn't she ask you to play High School Musical for us in discussion section instead of Orfeo?" (I was correct.) When I was leaving, I heard her daughter say, "Mom, it's so much better than opera!"

A few hours later, I was walking in the same area again, and I saw Dr. Patton and her children again. While I was still at a distance from them, her daughter recognized me, pointed her finger in my direction, and said, "There's Kate!"
JHU_Kate
Class of 2010
Neuroscience Major
Classics Minor
Senior Arts Certificate Candidate in Dance

http://blogs.hopkins-interactive.com/kate

JHU_Jackie

  • Hopkins Alumni
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #19 on: October 20, 2007, 09:54 PM »
I love Professor David.  He's teaching my Contemporary International Politics class right now and he's amazing.  So organized, informative, and funny.  I learn sooo much in each day of class.
Jackie M.
Class of 2010
Philosophy
Read My Blog: Murphy's Law Gone Right

JHU_Laura

  • Hopkins Alumni
  • Ask Me a Question!
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #20 on: October 23, 2007, 12:06 AM »
DR David is amazing!!! CIP was such a great class.

I am taking this class from Professor Irwin right now and he is brilliant/amazing.  We talked about Great Gatsby today and the last hour of class we listened to jazz/music we would have "heard at one of Gatsby's parties" it was amazing.

JHU_Stefanie

  • Hopkins Student
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #21 on: November 07, 2007, 04:03 AM »
Yes, like Kate, I would like to update you on amazing professors.  

Professor Elizabeth Johnson:  This is my professor of Biostatistics (a 300-level required Public Health course).  She is absolutely amazing because she truly inspires you to dig in.  I am not fond of probabilities whatsoever, but I have yet to be disgusted of the course work.  It is so applicable and current in terms of public health research.  Plus, she is amazingly down to earth.  She slips in so many hilarious sayings throughout lecture.  For example, one day when our class was moved to Merganthaler, she was forced to write on the chalkboard.  She was erasing, and the eraser slipped out of her hand and hit her shoulder.  She mumbles, "Ah, I'm attacking myself with the eraser."  ..... I thought it was quite hilarious.  Plus, I love how she's out and about around campus with her girlfriends on a Saturday afternoon.  It makes it more real.

:)

JHU_Jackie

  • Hopkins Alumni
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #22 on: November 09, 2007, 08:40 PM »
I have another update, I like Professor Stephen Shore for Microeconomic Theory.  He really knows what he is tlaking about and is really enthusiastic.  I mean he ran into John Nash (A Beautiful Mind & Pulitzer Prize Winner for Nash Equilibrium) when he was an undergrad in college, that's pretty cool!  Also, he seems like he is going to make a lot of positive changes (this is his first year at Hopkins).  He was asking our opinion about whether we think it would be a good thing if there was offered Econ Courses with Math like Micro Theory which has a lot of Calculus and Econ Courses without Math that is more Political Scienceish.  Basically, he is a really good professor and is really nice.
Jackie M.
Class of 2010
Philosophy
Read My Blog: Murphy's Law Gone Right

JHU_Josh

  • Hopkins Alumni
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #23 on: November 14, 2007, 02:30 PM »
Dr. Stephen Drigotas is possibly the best person to have for any psychology class.  He makes a 250 person lecture seem personal and engaging.  The class is a lot of fun.  I am even trying to get into his Social Psychology Class next semester!

I also have to say that I enjoy Professor Linda DeLibero for my Intro to Film Class.  It is partly because it is my major and so I've gotten to build a better relationship with her recently.  

I didn't believe it, even on campus, but GET TO KNOW YOUR PROFESSORS!  I almost missed out on taking Intro to Film Production next semester, but I talked to Professor DeLibero and because I did, she helped me get into the one spot that was left after preregistration because someone crossed their name off the list!  So make the effort!
Josh
Class of 2011
Film and Media Studies

Check out the blog:
http://blogs.hopkins-interactive.com/josh

JHU_Jermaine

  • Hopkins Student
Johns Hopkins Faculty
« Reply #24 on: November 24, 2007, 07:20 PM »
I know this is a bit broad, but I've liked all of the humanities/social science professors I've had...I think smaller classes allow professors to be more human/humane.
Jermaine
Class of '09

Check out my Guest Blog!


"You can't have everything. Where would you put it?"-Steven Wright