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Author Topic: Meet JHU_Kate T- Redding, CT  (Read 5985 times)

JHU_KateT

  • Hopkins Student
Meet JHU_Kate T- Redding, CT
« on: September 26, 2010, 07:47 PM »
Introductions

Hi I'm Kate T. from Redding, CT. I am a Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering major with a minor in French Cultural Studies. I love Hopkins because of all the people rock and all the professors are so brilliant.

My Classes
Freshman Fall
Calculus III
Physics for Physical Science Majors
Physics Lab
Advanced Speaking and Writing in French
Organic Chemistry
Chemical Engineering Today

Intersession
A Self-made Society: America's Social Nineteenth Century
Infinite Jest: An Intersession Immersion

Freshman Spring
The Culture of the Engineering Profession
Differential Equations
Physics for Physical Science Majors II
Advanced Speaking and Writing in French II
Introduction to Chemical & Biological Process Analysis

Sophomore Fall
Modeling and Statistics for the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineer
Engineering Thermodynamics
Biochemistry
Biochemistry Lab
La France Contemporaine I
Research (for Credit)

Intersession
Research (for Credit)

Sophomore Spring
Cell Biology
Transport Phenomena I
Introduction to Programming in Java
La France Contemporaine II
Social Psychology
Research (for Credit)

Junior Fall
Teaching French in Public Schools
Transport Phenomena II
Applied Physical Chemistry
Projects in Design: Modeling Pharmacokinetics
Human Genetics
Research (for Credit)

Junior Intersession
German Elements I

Junior Spring
Senior Product and Process Design
Chemical and Biological Separation
Reaction Kinetics
Introduction à la littérature française II
Research (for Credit)

Senior Fall
Senior Lab
Controls and Dynamics
Eloquent French
Documentary Photography
Research (for credit)

My Activities
SAAB - This is what I'm doing right now! I write blogs for prospective students and help answer questions on the forums and Facebook groups for prospective, admitted, and enrolled students.

French Club
The French Club is for the Francophiles at Hopkins. They host a lot of cool events like crepe and cheese parties. So, if you like to talk in French and eat amazing French food, join French club! 

Blue Key Society
I enjoy walking backwards talking all about Hopkins and why I love it so much. I love answering questions!

Research in the Engineering in Oncology Lab
I do research at Wirtz Lab where I look at the morphology of cells to see if we can better diagnose cancer. I love doing research because it is such an unique experience to Hopkins!

Housing
Freshman Year
I live in AMR II Clark which is basically the best place to live ever. The AMRs are really social and fun; we always hang out in the hall (what I am doing right now haha). My room is really awesome because I have corkboard on the walls that make decorating so much easier. I live in a double with my awesome roommate. :)
Sophomore Year
I live in the Homewood Apartments which are apartments near the south end of campus. They are very spacious and include a kitchen so I learn how to not burn pasta! YAY. I love it so much.
Junior Year
I live in a spacious apartment off-campus :). I wrote about it here.
Senior Year
Since I'm graduating in December, I'm subletting from a girl studying abroad fall semester.
Feel free to ask me any questions!
JHU_Kate T.
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
French Cultural Studies
Read all about my life
Ask me a question

"Whoever said orange was the new pink was seriously disturbed."

reneehaughton

  • Newbie
Meet JHU_Kate T- Redding, CT
« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2011, 08:28 PM »
Hi Kate!
Your face looks really familiar. Did you attend UCONN Mentor Connection 2009?

JHU_KateT

  • Hopkins Student
Meet JHU_Kate T- Redding, CT
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2011, 02:50 PM »
Yes I did! Wow- small world! Feel free to ask me any questions haha :)
JHU_Kate T.
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
French Cultural Studies
Read all about my life
Ask me a question

"Whoever said orange was the new pink was seriously disturbed."

JHU_Admin

  • Administrator
Re: Meet JHU_Kate T- Redding, CT
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2011, 02:36 PM »
A series of questions and answers previously posted to JHU_Kate's thread accidentally were removed. Here they are now:


Posted by AnnaLewis on June 20, 2011
Quote
Hi, I am Anna Lewis and I live in Germantown, TN. I am thinking about coming to Johns Hopkins, if accepted, and swimming for the school. The swim coach has contacted me, but I am a little worried about being an athlete at a school that is so academic. What are your thoughts on this?

One of the things I think you have to keep in mind about college and college sports is that you have a lot more free time than you did in high school. I think having a sport forces you to plan your time wisely (since it's a bit more scheduled) and helps with the adjusting to college. I know lots of athletes that have tough schedules and still succeed, have fun, and excel in their sports. The teams are all pretty close, so athletes have told me they have been able to ask the upperclassmen for advice or depend on some of the other team members.

JHU_Noah plays soccer, so I'd ask him too!

***********************************************************************************

Posted by Sandya on July 1, 2011
Quote
Hi-
 I saw that you took Orgo first semester. How was it? Would you recommend that? I've heard both ways (that it's good to take orgo with covered grades and that it's good to wait). Thanks.

Hi Sandya,

It's definitely a hard class. In fact, many academic advisers suggest that it is hard to take it their first semester of college and I'd definitely suggest that you contact your adviser. I had trouble at first with the class, but once I learned the study techniques I needed, I did well. I think it's an individual decision.


BlancheBunny103

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Kate T- Redding, CT
« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2012, 02:18 AM »
Hi Kate
I'm interested in studying French Cultural studies at JHU, just like you =)
Generally how proficient at French are ppl in your French class? Are they super fluent?
How hard is French Cultural studies compare to French Lit?


JHU_KateT

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Kate T- Redding, CT
« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2012, 06:50 PM »
Hi BlancheBunny!

Just let me preface: french cultural studies is a great minor! So, currently, I'm in a 400 level class (La France Contemporaine II). Pretty much everyone can speak French at a pretty high level; sometimes, we get stuck on words, but we talk about politics, our value systems, and the economy similarly to the level that we talk about it in English. La France Contemporaine (it's a year-long class) is very conversational, so you definitely need to have a high level of listening comprehension and speaking ability. We also write essays on tests, so you need to be able to write an essay without a dictionary. In the 300 level class, we focused a lot more on grammar and strengthening the skills you need to improve (writing, reading, speaking, listening, etc.). I wouldn't say that french cultural studies is harder or easier than french lit. I really like french cultural studies because I'm really interested in the french culture (why are french women so skinny, why do they strike, etc :)), so I don't mind learning lots of facts and reading a lot about the french culture. In french lit classes, it's more reading books and discussing them in class. I would say french cultural studies focuses more on speaking and listening, while french lit focuses more on reading and writing.

Let me know if you have any more questions!
JHU_Kate T.
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
French Cultural Studies
Read all about my life
Ask me a question

"Whoever said orange was the new pink was seriously disturbed."

annie

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Kate T- Redding, CT
« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2012, 09:23 PM »
Hi! I'm from New Milford, CT!

I know that I definitely want to continue with French in college, but I also want to major in BME. Do a lot of people double major or major/minor in science and a language? What are the advantages/disadvantages of double majoring vs. major/minoring? Also, have you or people you know who are also science majors done study abroad programs in France? I'd love to study abroad, but can I even combine study abroad with BME?

I'm also wondering about the difference between BME and chemical/biomolecular engineering and which I should take if I want to do research in genetics, stem cells, oncology, and the like.

Lastly (sorry this is so long!), can you tell me more about Intersession and what it is?

JHU_KateT

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Kate T- Redding, CT
« Reply #7 on: April 01, 2012, 12:17 PM »
Hi Annie!

I'm excited that you are considering majoring/minoring in French. I absolutely love the French department here; the professors are incredibly engaging. I know some people that double major in science/engineering and a language; my friend is majoring in BME and Spanish. There are definitely more natural sciences and language majors, but it's definitely doable with BME. One of my favorite things about Hopkins is the lack of a core curriculum.You have to take a certain amount of credits of humanities and social science courses, they can be in whatever area you want. So, for me, most of humanities credits are French with a few other ones thrown in. For me, I chose to minor in French because I am more interested in conversation and french culture whereas the French major is more focused on writing eloquently and analyzing literature (there is also a french literature minor). I also wanted to take more classes outside of my major and my minor and I'm planning on graduating early, so that's the reason I decided on minoring in French. BTW, if you want to major in French Culture, you can actually do an interdisciplinary major in French Culture.

I know a bunch of science majors that have studied abroad in France. It's definitely much more difficult for engineering. For ChemBE, only a few study abroad (and that's people that come in with a LOT of credits). However, I've heard that BME is a little bit more flexible and you can either study abroad in an english-speaking country or save all your humanities for one semester and go abroad to a french speaking country. You have to make sure you start planning this your first semester though! However, if you don't have the opportunity to do this during the school year, there are a lot of options in the summer. We have a Vredenburg scholarship, which gives money to engineers who want to do research, an internship, or take courses abroad. You can literally go wherever you want if you get the scholarship.

To be honest, if you're more interested in molecular biology (and hard sciences), I would go for ChemBE. ChemBE is more science-based (from my experience) as we take 16 credits of advanced science (including Orgo, Biochem, Cell Biology, Biochem Lab, and an another class- you can take genetics). BME, from what I've seen, is a bit more computer based. My friend who is a BME does a lot of Matlab in his courses. I currently do research in an oncology lab in ChemBE. However, we have BMEs, bio majors, and even a pre-med East Asian Studies major. If you decide to major in BME, you can still work in a lab in ChemBE and vice versa. So,  I would look at the courses online and see what interests you most.

So, we have three weeks of winter break. After that, we have three more weeks of winter break called Intersession. During Intersession, you can stay home for those extra three weeks, study abroad, or come back to Hopkins. At Hopkins, you can take up to three credits of classes. These classes are really cool; for example, they've had classes like the Science of Baking, the Psychology of Love, etc. They're really fun and interesting. Last year, I did research for credit (which was nice because I was able to work full-time instead of in between my classes and activities) and my freshman year, I took a history class and a writing seminars class. It was fun to take humanities classes.

Hope this didn't take you too long to read and let me know if you have any more questions.
JHU_Kate T.
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
French Cultural Studies
Read all about my life
Ask me a question

"Whoever said orange was the new pink was seriously disturbed."

JHU_KateT

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Kate T- Redding, CT
« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2013, 01:17 PM »
I received this question:
I was admitted but denied from the BME program at Hopkins. I am currently searching for another major to pick. Why did you pick ChemBE? I've also always done well in math, so what is the most mathy of the majors?

My answer:
When I came to Hopkins as a junior to visit, I thought I wanted to be BME. When I went to the info session, I thought it was very electrical and computer based and that was not what I wanted. I went to the ChemBE session and liked that ChemBEs took a lot of hard science classes. I also liked that there were a lot of opportunities for jobs outside of bio if I decided not to do that upon graduation. Math and physics are the core of any engineering major. If you're interested in math, but the application of it to statistics and computing, I would suggest applied math. But, all the major are awesome here, so I would look at all the majors you're interested in and look at sample classes. Then, see what classes interest you most. They also have an open house for all the majors during orientation where you can learn more about each one in depth.
JHU_Kate T.
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
French Cultural Studies
Read all about my life
Ask me a question

"Whoever said orange was the new pink was seriously disturbed."

young_na97

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Kate T- Redding, CT
« Reply #9 on: April 18, 2013, 09:59 PM »
Hi Kate!

My name is Young and I am a freshman in high school at the moment. I find it interesting that you enjoy the French language&culture so much! When I went to France on vacation, I was blown away by all the amazing sights! Especially standing upon the Eiffel Tower and the Versailles Museum!

Although I love French very much, I am very passionate about German as well. I was born in Germany, and I lived there for 11 years. I am fluent in the language- and I love it! This year, I'm taking German 2. But next year, I'm actually going to skip German 3 and move up to German 4. Meaning I'll be taking AP German in my junior year. So, QUESTION #1: Will JHU see this jump? And how do you think the admissions staff will react to this?

QUESTION #2: Did you take both the ACT and the SAT when you were in high school?

QUESTION #3: How were you involved during your four years in high school?

QUESTION #4: Did you apply early or regular decision to JHU?

Young

JHU_KateT

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Kate T- Redding, CT
« Reply #10 on: April 23, 2013, 11:14 PM »
Hi Young!

The Eiffel Tower is great - can you believe the French thought it was ugly at first?! :)

I took German here at Hopkins and it is so interesting (and different from French). I can totally understand why you love the language. If you end up coming to Hopkins, I would totally suggest taking a course. The department is very organized and organizes a lot of interesting events to attend.

ANSWER #1: JHU gets your transcript so they will see that you skipped a year of German. However, I am not an admissions counselor so I don't know the answer to this question! I would ask on the "Ask Admissions" section of this forum.

ANSWER #2: I only took the SAT. Princeton Review or one of the random groups has a free test you can take (without any commitment) that compares your predicted score on the ACT and SAT. I ended up scoring better on the practice SAT, so I took that one instead. Again, I'm not an admissions counselor, but JHU does look at both tests.

ANSWER #3: I was an athlete for my four years in swimming and skiing. I took a lot of art classes, so I got involved in art club (which was basically more time to hang out with people that were very talented in art). I was very involved at a children's museum near my house. I spent a lot of time volunteering there and later helping to run the volunteer program. :)

ANSWER #4: I applied Regular Decision.

Let me know if you have any more questions!
JHU_Kate T.
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
French Cultural Studies
Read all about my life
Ask me a question

"Whoever said orange was the new pink was seriously disturbed."

young_na97

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Kate T- Redding, CT
« Reply #11 on: May 11, 2013, 08:10 PM »
Hi Kate!
Which colleges did you apply to when you were a senior in high school, (besides Hopkins)?
If you cannot answer this, how many, and what kind of colleges (Big, Small, Famous, Low Admission, High Admission, etc.)

JHU_KateT

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Kate T- Redding, CT
« Reply #12 on: May 16, 2013, 12:06 PM »
Hey!

Sorry I was in the middle of finals. Including Hopkins, I applied to 9 schools. They were a mix of schools, but they were mostly middle-sized (similar to Hopkins) with some bigger schools mixed in. All of the schools applied to were competitive in terms of admissions, but I applied to schools all over the place (even in Canada). Some of them were more well-known than others. The common thread between them was that they were all in cities and had strong engineering programs.
JHU_Kate T.
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
French Cultural Studies
Read all about my life
Ask me a question

"Whoever said orange was the new pink was seriously disturbed."

cllb46

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Kate T- Redding, CT
« Reply #13 on: December 28, 2013, 02:14 AM »
Hi Kate!

I've been reading your blog and saw that you are minoring in French Cultural Studies. My intention was always to major in Chemistry and minor in French language, but it would have to be a major in French language should I attend Hopkins.

I was wondering if you could clarify the difference between a French major and a French Cultural Studies minor. My intent is to become fluent and use the language to converse in the country when I travel there.

Additionally, do you need a background in the language to take an advanced class at Hopkins? My high school does not offer French, but I self-taught for a year and was able to order food, pay, and ask for directions when I went to Paris.

Thank you in advance for the response!

JHU_KateT

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Kate T- Redding, CT
« Reply #14 on: December 29, 2013, 08:55 PM »
Hi!

It is so nice to see that other science majors are interested in French. I have LOVED all the french classes I've taken here at Hopkins.

A French major at Hopkins is technically a French Literature major. You take a year of french literature (starting with medieval writings all the way to modern day and around 6 literature classes. The French Cultural studies minor focuses more on French culture and you really get a handle on their government and their culture. An example of a french culture class is Paris in the 1900s - they are basically sociology or history classes, but just in French. I'm a French Cultural Studies minor because originally I didn't think I'd like literature classes and the major was too many classes with my major (which is more rigid than the chemistry major) and graduating early.

The french cultural studies minor is more flexible than the French major because you can take both culture and literature classes. I ended up taking a literature class and absolutely loving it, so I think highly of both areas. French culture and French literature have a different set of professors, but I have loved all my professors. I would suggest the major if you are interested in taking literature classes, but in French and if you want to devote at least one or two classes a semester to French.

To take any advanced courses (i.e. French literature or culture), you need to have taken Advanced French (the last language course) or place out of it. The placement test will tell you what level of French you are at. I'm very impressed that you were able to self-teach French (especially the pronunciation - the French like to omit a lot of letters :)). To give a sense of what Advanced French requires, each week we focused one day on some grammar, one day on random vocab, and one day on discussing the three pieces of text we wrote essays on over the weekend.

Feel free to ask me any questions and I hope you're enjoying the holidays!!
JHU_Kate T.
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
French Cultural Studies
Read all about my life
Ask me a question

"Whoever said orange was the new pink was seriously disturbed."