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Author Topic: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT  (Read 7105 times)

JHU_Nick

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Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« on: September 22, 2010, 04:46 PM »
Hello everyone,

I'm Nick, a proud member of the Johns Hopkins class of 2014!  I hail from Woodbridge, Connecticut, a small town outside of New Haven.  I'm double majoring in Computer Science and Economics.  I'm very interested in computers and technology, but am by no means someone who sits at home on the computer all day.  I enjoy playing tennis and golf as well as anything involving the ocean (fishing, boating, etc.). In addition, I am a member of the Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity, the Hopkins Emergency Response Unit, and the Office of Undergraduate Admissions.

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Why Hopkins?

I chose Hopkins because I liked the availability of double majoring, and the intersession program.  For those of you who haven't heard of it, Intersession is basically an optional time during the month of January where you can take a 1 or 2 credit class as a way of "dipping your toes" into a completely different field of study, or where you can take a class completely unrelated to anything you've ever thought of studying.  Another reason I chose Hopkins was because I thought, and still do think, that it has one of the most beautiful campuses that I've ever seen.


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My Classes

(Senior Fall Semester)
1. Cognition (3 credits)
2. Hebrew 1 (4 credits)
3. Databases (3 credits)
4. Security and Privacy in Computing (3 credits)
5. The Economics of Growing Up (3 credits)
Total: 16 credits

(Junior Spring Semester)
1. Computer Network Fundamentals (3 credits)
2. Financial Markets and Institutions (3 credits)
3. Managerial Econ and Business Strategies (3 credits)
4. Introduction to Algorithms (3 credits)
5. Professional Communication (3 credits)
Total: 15 credits

(Junior Fall Semester)
1. Investment and Portfolio Management (3 credits)
2. Computer System Fundamentals (3 credits)
3. Monetary Analysis (3 credits)
4. Econometrics (3 credits)
5. Object Oriented Software Engineering (3 credits)
Total: 15 credits

(Sophomore Spring Semester)
1. Macroeconomic Theory (4.5 credits)
2. Physics II for Engineers (4 credits)
3. Physics II Lab (1 credit)
4. Automata & Computation Theory (3 credits)
5. Corporate Finance (3 credits)
Total: 15.5 credits

(Sophomore Fall Semester)
1. Physics I for Engineers (4 credits)
2. Physics I Lab (1 credit)
3. Microeconomic Theory (4.5 credits)
4. Discrete Mathematics (4 credits)
5. Data Structures (3 credits)
6. Computer Ethics (1 credit)
Total: 17.5 credits

(Freshman Spring Semester)
1. Elements of Microeconomics (3 credits)
2. Intro to Fiction and Poetry II (3 credits)
3. Intermediate Programming (4 credits)
4. Introduction to Business (4 credits)
Total: 14 credits

(Freshman Fall Semester)
1. Elements of Macroeconimcs (3 credits)
2. Intro to Fiction and Poetry I (3 credits)
3. Intro to Programming JAVA (3 credits)
4. Calculus III (4 credits)
5. Intro to American Politics (3 credits)
Total: 16 credits


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Activities I'm involved in:

Bootup Baltimore- At Bootup Baltimore, we take in old computers through donations (often coming from Hopkins), fix them up, and donate them to people through out the community in Baltimore including public schools with no technology programs and churches.

Hopkins Emergency Response Unit- The on-campus EMS unit responding to medical emergencies here at Homewood.

Alpha Epsilon Pi Fraternity

MSE Symposium- Student led and run group responsible for bringing interesting speakers to campus.


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Housing

I'm living off campus in a house with 4 other guys, all in AEPi, a few blocks away on East University. Freshman year I was a proud resident of AMR I and sophmore year I lived in the penthouse suite of Charles Commons.

If you have any questions, don't be shy! I'm always happy to chat. Thanks for reading!

-Nick
Nick G.
Class of 2014
Computer Science/Economics
El Blogo

"If you had one shot, or one opportunity
To seize everything you ever wanted, in one moment
Would you capture it? Or just let it slip?"
-Eminem

alfredzong

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2010, 10:34 PM »
Hi Nick!

I'm Alfred from Singapore, going to RD JHU ~~deadline's around the clock!

It is great to know from you that double major (and perhaps plus another minor) is possible at JHU, but does that mean the life will be miserably centred around classes/assignments? Besides, is any combination possible, like Physics + Philosophy or Sociology?

Can you also tell me more about your intersession programme at Homewood? like what's so special about its course and what's the schedule of class? I bet intersession would neither be a slacking period nor be a intensive curricular time.

Thanks so much! Hope to hear from you soon  =)

JHU_Nick

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Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2010, 01:35 AM »
Hey Alfred!

As far as classes are concerned when it comes to double majoring, you may have to take an extra class or two in any given semester.  This is, however not too overwhelming--if your grades are up, advisers are usually willing to grant a course overload.  In regards to being centered around classes and assignments, I wouldn't say your life is completely controlled by work.  As of now, I certainly have more than enough time to handle my work and have free time.

For what you plan on majoring in, I recommend you look at the course websites and see what is required.  Plan on taking 4 or 5 classes per semester, for a total of around 16 credits. See what each major requires and plan around that, as much as you can, to see how manageable the course load will be.  I don't know off the top of my head how many common classes Physics and Philosophy/Sociology have in common, so I cannot attest to the manageability of that combination.

For intersession, I'm not quite sure what you mean. Intersession is an optional time in January where students can take a wide variety of different classes, whether to count towards a major/minor, to experience something new, or just for fun.  These classes are pass/fail and usually worth 1-2 credits.  If you'd like to see the course listing, you can visit here http://orchid.hosts.jhmi.edu/summer/icourses/courses/acad_courses.asp.  

Hope this helps,

Nick
Nick G.
Class of 2014
Computer Science/Economics
El Blogo

"If you had one shot, or one opportunity
To seize everything you ever wanted, in one moment
Would you capture it? Or just let it slip?"
-Eminem

JohnnyHoppy

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2011, 07:22 PM »
Hey Nick,
I am hoping to double major in Comp. Sci and a writings class (not sure atm if it should be straightout English or anything else). Anyway, I am sure you have heard of the 5 year concurrent program @ CS. I wanted to ask, do you think it would be manageable for me to take part in that program (any specific requirements for it?) and major in an English course at the same time? Would it be too burdensome?

Also, please shed some light on the CS class. What do you guys do? What happened in the Midterms? What is the project for final? I think I read somewhere from a Hop student that they had to create the battleship game... is it too hard? How are the professors? Do they give a LOT of HW? I know that I will get a lot of reading assignments (from what I have read in JHU_Lauren's blog, it is about a book per 2 weeks) from the English classes but will the CS classes add up? Will I be squeezed under the burden?

Haha, sorry for too many questions but I was hoping to gain an insight from a fellow comp. sci student. Also, since I have no prior experience in programming... so will it be manageable for me to start anew in the CS class? Or is it just dedicated to knowledgeable programmers?

Thanks a lot!

JHU_Nick

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Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2011, 09:26 AM »
Hey!

Since I'm only a Freshman, it is a little too early for me to start thinking about getting my masters, and I don't really know many students in the upper level CS program to ask.  However, if you would like more information on the concurrent program, you can try going here : http://www.cs.jhu.edu/current-undergraduate/adviseman.html and just doing a search for concurrent and you'll find some decent info on it.  You also may be interested in http://blogs.hopkins-interactive.com/academics/category/computer-science/, the second blog is from a CS major who was involved in the concurrent program.  I'm sorry I cannot be of much help personally as of now, but hopefully you can learn from those links.

As far as CS class, we cover a lot of ground.  The midterms, for Intermediate Programming (one of the base classes for CS, which I'm taking now) generally consist of four sections.  First, there is true/false, then multiple choice, short answer, and long answer.  Here is the course website, if you scroll down to the bottom there are a few past midterms that you can take a look at.http://gaming.jhu.edu/~phf/2011/spring/cs120/  The final project the past few years (subject to change) has been to create your own computer game version of battleship.  As far as the difficulty and work load, it is both a challenge and there will be long assignments, but it is most certainly doable.  The CS assignments aren't easy--you won't be able to do them an hour before class and expect to get an A, but if you put a few hours a week into it you'll be fine.  As far as manageability of double majoring, it really depends on the person and how well you manage your time.  Some can manage the work better than others, so its really all about how well you personally do your work, although it is certainly possible.

Lastly, when it comes to prior experience, it definitely helps but is not needed.  Intro to Programming with JAVA will teach you everything you need to know to build off of for your CS degree.  Also, programming, although a major aspect of it, is not the only thing CS majors need to know.  There are several aspects of the CS major that do not have to do with programming, so even if your not the best at it (and I assure you, I am far from the best), you can still get by.

Hope this helps! Let me know if you have any other questions.

-Nick
Nick G.
Class of 2014
Computer Science/Economics
El Blogo

"If you had one shot, or one opportunity
To seize everything you ever wanted, in one moment
Would you capture it? Or just let it slip?"
-Eminem

JohnnyHoppy

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2011, 10:53 PM »
Do you happen to know the textbook used for both Intro to Programming and Intermediate Programming?
- Thanks

JHU_Nick

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Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2011, 08:53 PM »
Hey! For intermediate, we used two (copied from the course website):
Brian W. Kernighan, Dennis M. Ritchie: The C Programming Language, 2nd edition, Prentice Hall, 1988.
Andrew Koenig, Barbara E. Moo: Accelerated C++, Addison-Wesley, 2000.
Since the course mainly focuses on C and C++ is only the last part of the semester, the C Programming Language book is the main one.  
For Intro, the textbook is "Introduction to Programming with Java, A Problem Solving Approach" by John Dean and Raymond Dean.
I thought the Java textbook was really good, I've actually used it recently for some programs I wrote outside the class and it was able to help with some of that code.  As for the Intermediate books, they were a bit more confusing (I actually never even got the C++ one), but the C one was kind of a hard read (although the class revolves mostly around writing programs, not what you read in the textbook).  Then again, it could just be that C and C++ are inherently insane to learn, so writing a textbook teaching them to someone in simple terms is a difficult task.

Hope that helps!
Nick G.
Class of 2014
Computer Science/Economics
El Blogo

"If you had one shot, or one opportunity
To seize everything you ever wanted, in one moment
Would you capture it? Or just let it slip?"
-Eminem

BlancheBunny103

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2012, 02:21 AM »
Hi Nick
I'm a RD applicant for class of 2016 XD
Just wondering, in your opinion which dorm do you like best so far?
I'd love to live in a single in my freshmen year. How did you manage to get a single this year? Any tips?



JHU_Nick

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Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2012, 02:15 PM »
Hey!

So the "best of dorms" debate is one which has been raging here for a long time. Each dorm certainly has its pros and cons. I, personally, loved living in the AMR's, but there are many who have different opinions than I.  If you'd like to see other thoughts on each dorm, check out this thread: http://www.hopkins-interactive.com/forums/housing/dorms-amrs-ab-wolman-mccoy/. Also, check out our Cribs videos (including mine!!!) to see Hopkins students showing off their rooms so you can really get a feel for what you want. http://www.hopkins-interactive.com/videos/

In terms of living in a single, I'd recommend you at least consider having a roommate. I believe it is really part of the freshman year experience. However, if you decide a single is the way to go, they are certainly available and it is essentially a lottery as to who gets one.  When you get all your housing forms and such, just check the box and that would be the best way to get one freshman year. As a sophomore, your odds of getting your own room increase a lot, since 3/4 of the Sophomore dorms are comprised only of suite style singles, so when you get to be a sophomore, just hope to get a good lottery number. That really is the best tip I (or anyone else) can give you.

Best of luck!
Nick G.
Class of 2014
Computer Science/Economics
El Blogo

"If you had one shot, or one opportunity
To seize everything you ever wanted, in one moment
Would you capture it? Or just let it slip?"
-Eminem

amahop

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #9 on: April 15, 2012, 09:07 AM »
I am curious about the summer internship possibilities in the financial firms such as Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan, etc. as a JHU student.  Is it readily available through the JHU Career Services?  What is the process of obtaining one?  Thank you for your information.

JHU_Nick

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Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #10 on: April 15, 2012, 10:04 AM »
Hey! So the career center is very helpful for finding internships. Companies, including some of the ones you listed, often come to campus via the career center for information sessions and recruitment visits. The process of obtaining one varies from student to student and firm to firm. Some firms like to make a lot of use of the career center in applying, others will have you apply more through them directly than with the career center.

Typically, you can find offers in finance through J-Connect, an online job posting board that the career center hosts. Once you've found something that interests you, there is information in the posting regarding how to apply, the requirements for applying and people to contact if you are interested. Like I said, though, there are different requirements for every firm, so some may have you go through a different process.

When I got my internship in finance this summer, it was from a posting on J-Connect which led me to go to a career fair in New York, partially sponsored by Hopkins, which then led to an interview and eventually an offer.

So, in short, yes, there certainly are internship possibilities and the career center will help you seek them out. If you'd like to learn more about the career center, check out the blog I wrote about it yesterday (http://blogs.hopkins-interactive.com/nick/2012/04/why-hopkins-for-jobs/).

Hope this helps!

-Nick
Nick G.
Class of 2014
Computer Science/Economics
El Blogo

"If you had one shot, or one opportunity
To seize everything you ever wanted, in one moment
Would you capture it? Or just let it slip?"
-Eminem

shroffpradyumn

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2012, 04:14 AM »
Hey Nick,
   My name is Pradyumn and I have been admitted to Johns Hopkins. My intended major is Computer Science and I am currently deciding between Berkeley and Hopkins. After researching about the CS program at Johns Hopkins and Hopkins in general, I think that the university will be a great fit for me. However, knowing very well that rankings are often misleading, seeing Berkeley at the top of CS rankings is making it difficult for me to enroll at Johns Hopkins. So, can you share a bit about your CS experience at JHU and the opportunities you get after graduating from JHU as compared to Berkeley. Thank you.

Sincerely,
Pradyumn Shroff

JHU_Nick

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Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #12 on: April 17, 2012, 11:25 PM »
Hi Pradyumn,

I can totally understand your dilemma, as choosing between the two schools for computer science is certainly a tough choice. As far as opportunities go, you'll find that many of the computer science professors are very engaging, both during and after class. For example, a friend of mine is concentrating in Natural Language Processing within the computer science department, and was able to find a research opportunity just by talking to one of his professors after class. In addition to research, internship and job opportunities are pretty prevalent, and just for this summer I know people who got internships at places such as Microsoft and Facebook. Seeing as I don't know much about Berkeley's post graduation opportunities, and as a sophomore I don't know much about Hopkins' either, it is hard for me to make a comparison in this respect. I hope this helps, and feel free to ask any other questions you may have.

-Nick
Nick G.
Class of 2014
Computer Science/Economics
El Blogo

"If you had one shot, or one opportunity
To seize everything you ever wanted, in one moment
Would you capture it? Or just let it slip?"
-Eminem

janeshrahlan

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #13 on: May 16, 2012, 05:08 PM »
Admin Note: We have moved your topic to a different student topic as JHU_Lauren is currently graduating from Johns Hopkins and not accessible to respond to questions. JHU_Nick is a double major with economics and can answer your questions.

Hey Lauren,

I see you're an economics minor. As far as economics goes at JHU, how are the opportunities in the internship and job market? Do you know any majors who would know this more in depth? How does the recruiting process work here and do a lot of the bigger firms recruit at JHU? How are the classes and opportunities within the major on campus itself? Thanks!

JHU_Nick

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Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #14 on: May 22, 2012, 06:16 PM »
Hey,


So as an econ major at JHU, you'll find that tons of firms are always coming around on recruiting trips. Everything from major banks to the Federal Reserve to other smaller companies have opportunities posted on the Hopkins careers network site as well as come around to recruit on campus. Classes for econ majors start of pretty big, but very quickly will decrease in size. For example, for the intro to econ classes and the required classes, sizes will typically be in the 80-200 people range. However, as you go on and get more advanced, they will decrease to 10-20 people. Even for the large classes, though, professors and TAs are very accessible (TA's will typically only have around 20 students, so they are usually very quick in answering emails). There are only a few required classes within the econ major, which is nice since it really gives you a lot of freedom in how you manage your learning. Hope this helps!
Nick G.
Class of 2014
Computer Science/Economics
El Blogo

"If you had one shot, or one opportunity
To seize everything you ever wanted, in one moment
Would you capture it? Or just let it slip?"
-Eminem

boadud20

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #15 on: September 28, 2012, 09:55 AM »
hi Nick
 I have a B.S in chemistry from VCU. am interested in the chemical engineering program. i prefer starting from scratch. what should I do?

JHU_Nick

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Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #16 on: September 28, 2012, 05:22 PM »
Hi boadud,

If you already have a B.S. degree, then you are not eligible to enroll in Hopkins as an undergraduate. You're only real option would be to try to get in as a masters/PhD student, in which case there is a completely different application process. These forums and advice are all for undergrads only, so we can't really help you much other than telling you that you cannot apply again as an undergrad if you already hold a degree.

Hope this helps,

Nick
Nick G.
Class of 2014
Computer Science/Economics
El Blogo

"If you had one shot, or one opportunity
To seize everything you ever wanted, in one moment
Would you capture it? Or just let it slip?"
-Eminem

shethkrishna

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #17 on: September 29, 2012, 12:59 PM »
Hi Nick,
I am a prospective student and am really hoping to attend JHU next year! I am filling out my common application at the time being and was wondering what I can do to make my application stand out from those of the other applicants. According to naviance, only 2 people from my school have been accepted to JHU. Should this be a red flag for me or should I still keep my hopes high? I am applying as ED because I would probably do anything to go there.

Thank you so much for your help!
Krishna

JHU_Nick

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Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #18 on: October 04, 2012, 01:51 PM »
Hey, Krishna!

Good to see that you are so enthusiastic about JHU! As far as making your application stand out, well, that really isn't something I or anyone else for that matter can help you with. That's something you will have to figure out. If there were a way to stand out, then everyone would do it, therefore making it not stand out anymore. Channel your inner creativity into something that works, since what you end up doing on your application is entirely up to you. Make sure it reflects who you are and what you are all about and hopefully you can make it stand out enough.

As far as hopes go, don't trust naviance. To be honest, the entire naviance program kind of bothers me. You cannot possibly base your choices on what naviance says. You have no idea what the two people who were accepted were like (and, for that matter, the people who were rejected). Hopkins looks at applicants very holistically, so looking at a few numbers from people from your school really is quite meaningless. You have no idea if those people had incredible essays, were some world champion of something, or had some incredible quality about them that truly made them stand out. To naviance, they are numbers (and from what I've heard, many times those numbers are not accurate). My best advice would be to forget that it exists, do your best to be creative and to show who you are in your application and to remember that you will be viewed as more than a number (although the numbers are important, too!).

Hope this helps,

Nick
Nick G.
Class of 2014
Computer Science/Economics
El Blogo

"If you had one shot, or one opportunity
To seize everything you ever wanted, in one moment
Would you capture it? Or just let it slip?"
-Eminem

shethkrishna

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #19 on: October 07, 2012, 02:38 PM »
Hey Nick,
Thank you so much for your wonderful advice! Guidance counselors and teachers are so attached to naviance that it makes me feel as though I need to trust it but it's true colleges base acceptance holistically. I will defs keep my hopes high and let you know what happens.
Thank you so much for your time!

Krishna

hofilena

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #20 on: October 25, 2012, 12:33 AM »
hi there!

I'm a "recruit" for fencing at Hopkins so I sent all my apps in for ED this year!
 i've posted around the forum asking about pre-med neuroscience stuff but now i'm more curious about what computer science is at hopkins. While doing typical college research I found out that CS is not the strongest at Hopkins, but is still able to be a great program. 

-How's the workload as a CS major and is it your daily math/computer solving shmuck?
-I'm not sure what you want to do after college but do you have something in mind and also are there internships available at Hopkins for this kind of job?
-I see your also minoring in econ.  How is the program there anyways?
-And lastly...do CS majors just stare at a computer the whole day.....

Thanks! :)
-Alyssa

JHU_Nick

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Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #21 on: October 25, 2012, 12:41 PM »
Hey Alyssa!

So to answer your first question, it really depends a lot on which classes you are taking, but as with most majors at Hopkins the workload tends to be a good amount, but is still managable and allows you to still have a life. A lot of it is programming, and by that I mean the majority of your assignments will be programming, but there still are a few required math classes.

As far as internships, we get pretty much an email a day about some sort of job or internship available to CS majors, as well as a whole bunch that the career center has gathered up for us.

For the econ major, it actually is pretty great here as well. What I really like about it is that it allows you to make your own schedule, and really tailor your study around what aspects of economics you are most interested in. For example, econ classes are not restricted to only traditional econ classes. Many courses in business, finance, politics, health and international studies can be used for econ credits, so you can really do what you want with the major.

Finally, yes, a lot of my day is spent in front of a computer, although not as much as one might expect. I have a fairly strict "no laptop in class" policy--I still have a notebook that I bring to class, and almost always leave my computer at home. Believe it or not, I've found that unless I'm working on some massive programming project, I'm on the computer less than people of many other majors.

Hope that helps!

-Nick
Nick G.
Class of 2014
Computer Science/Economics
El Blogo

"If you had one shot, or one opportunity
To seize everything you ever wanted, in one moment
Would you capture it? Or just let it slip?"
-Eminem

hofilena

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #22 on: October 25, 2012, 05:06 PM »
Thank you for answering!

As for the economics question, you can basically branch off to different "concentrations"? Hows the finance part of the econ major there?

JHU_Nick

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Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #23 on: October 25, 2012, 10:14 PM »
There aren't official "concentrations", however, you can sort of do your own thing. For example, I am more interested in finance, so some of the courses I'm taking/have taken are things like Corporate Finance and Investments/Portfolio Management. These courses actually have very little to do with economics (in the supply and demand sense) and more to do with stock valuation, bonds, risk, etc. There is also a financial economics minor, which encompasses many classes like these into an actual degree.
Nick G.
Class of 2014
Computer Science/Economics
El Blogo

"If you had one shot, or one opportunity
To seize everything you ever wanted, in one moment
Would you capture it? Or just let it slip?"
-Eminem

Felipe1

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Nick - Woodbridge, CT
« Reply #24 on: May 29, 2013, 02:41 AM »
Hi Nick,

My name is Felipe and I am a Junior at Granite Bay High School in California.  I am interested in studying Applied Mathematics and Statistics.  I'd like to focus on actuarial sciences, risk management and finance.

I have an admission related question.  Can you give me an idea of the weight given to essays, extracurricular activities, grades and standardized tests for admission purposes?

Also, what if I only have one subject test taken?  Does that reduces my chances to be admitted?

Thank you in advance for your answers.

Felipe