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Author Topic: Meet JHU_Jordan - Succasunna, NJ  (Read 6320 times)

JHU_Jordan

  • Hopkins Student
Meet JHU_Jordan - Succasunna, NJ
« on: September 28, 2012, 12:11 PM »
Apply to Johns Hopkins.

Hey there! I'm Jordan M. from Succasunna, New Jersey, and YOU should come to Johns Hopkins.  Why? I'll explain it to you shortly. Patience.

I'm a neuroscience / computer-science dual major, and I haven't ruled out the possibility of adding a robotics minor from the LCSR program as well before heading off to medical school.  Or, at least, such is the plan right now.  If it changes, I'll be sure to let you know immediately.

Like JHU_Alexa, I'm a bit of an 'order'-freak -- though I know I can't live up to her quality of forum-post formatting.  What follows is my (comparatively weak) attempt to make my page look as good as hers.

Why Johns Hopkins?
Chances are you've heard the name "Johns Hopkins" before.  That's because it's a world-leading reseearch institution in both healthcare-related as well as not healthcare-related fields.  Perhaps you recognize the names Woodrow Wilson, Adam Riess, Daniel Shectman..., all Nobel Prize winners who have roots at Johns Hopkins.  Or maybe you're more familiar with the baby-health-scale created by Hopkins graduate Apgar, or the New Yorkian Bloomberg, or Nightmare on Elm Street director Wes Craven -- all Hopkins alumni.

Hopkins is a truly exceptional college, home to the first academy of music ever established in America as well as some of the most groundbreaking medical and scientific discoveries of all time.  On top of its unbelievable repertoire of contributions to the humanities and medicine, you'll find the fantastic Johns Hopkins community that I've grown to love infinitely.  Whatever your personality type, we have a place for you here -- come find it!


 
Freshman Fall
  • Foundations of Brain, Behavior, and Cognition with Dr. Linda Gorman
  • Applied Chemical Equilibrium and Kinetics with Dr. Jane Greco
  • Calculus II For Biology and Medicine with Dr. Turgay Bayraktar
  • Intermediate Computer Programming with Dr. Peter Fröhlich
Freshman Spring
  • Cognitive Neuroscience: Exploring the Living Brain
  • Expository Writing: The Utopian Imagination
  • General Physics for Science Majors and General Physics Lab I
  • Data Structures

 
Sophomore Fall
  • Organic Chemistry I
  • Hebrew I
  • Build-A-Genome (seriously, check this thing out, it's awesome.)
  • Nervous Systems I

My Extracurriculars
Hopefully this list grows significantly in the near future:
  • The Student Admissions Advisory Board is, naturally, the greatest club on campus.  We're charged with the duty of telling you, prospective students, how great Johns Hopkins is by means of the interwebsmachine.  Are you convinced yet? Yes? Good.
  • NeuroJAYS is an awesome club where a bunch of Neuroscience students (or people who are simply interested in the topic) from all grades get together and review recent awesome neuro literature.  It's a great opportunity to meet up and see what kind of awesome stuff is happening in your field of study, and to meet other neuro-heads like yourself!
  • The ACM at Hopkins is like a computer-nerd's dream.  Except it's all so real.


Dorm Life
Current Housing: Top Floor of Homewood Apartments

But... Come on. Why are you really reading this section? Let's get real here and talk about freshman housing.

I am sorry to say it.  It pains me sincerely to tell you, my prospective students, but it is true: There are people who will lie to you at Hopkins.  They will bare their fangs, hiss savagely, and tell you that the AMRs are the best housing on campus.  They will coil their sinister webs of untruth around you and try to convince you McCoy is the place to be.  They will tempt you with their wicked songs, unjustly praising Buildings A and B.  They know not of what they speak.  For only a privileged few -- myself (gloriously) included -- know that Wolman is truly the best freshman dorm.

Wolman is conveniently located right next to the Beach, which is a good angry toss of a 'good-for-nothin'-textbook' away from the MSE Library (the one with D-Level, yes...).  It's also the perfect place to start your expeditions into the surrounding areas of Baltimore, whatwith the awesome places to eat along St. Paul and Calvert and the cool stores you can get to quite easily from your front door.

Now, I grant thee, ministers of AMR & A/B dark witchcraft, that thou art nearerest to the FFC than McCoy or Wolman.  But trust me, the air conditioning is quite nice, and having the CharMar right next door is so wondrously wonderful... I have no words.

Just.... just.... Wolman.  That's all I have to say, we're done here.
Jordan M.
Class of 2016

Neuroscience / Computer Science

Check out my blagoblag!

BlueJayHopeful

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Jordan - Succasunna, NJ
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2012, 01:11 AM »
Hey, Jordan!

I'm applying to Hopkins this year, and I think I might be interested in your major (Neuroscience, NOT Computer Science haha). I really like Biology, but I'm having trouble deciding between that and other interests like Politics and International Relations...so what has been your favorite part of the Neuroscience program, and why should I choose that over Political Science or IR?

JHU_Jordan

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Jordan - Succasunna, NJ
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2012, 04:08 PM »
Hey Sam!

The cool thing about Hopkins (well, one of the many cool things about Hopkins) is that you don't necessarily have to choose! Of course, I daresay neuroscience is the coolest major out there no matter what, but that doesn't mean that IR isn't just as awesome.  Because there's no core curriculum here, you can spend your freshman year (or your fall semester of freshman year, or your freshman/sophomore years, or whatever you like) taking whatever courses you're interested in, without having to worry about "WHAT WILL THEY THINK OF ME IF I DON'T KNOW WHAT MY MAJOR IS" and such.  The only person that's going to judge is JHU_Alex, and you don't have to worry about what he says anyhow.

My suggestion? Take Prof. Gorman's Foundations of Brain, Behavior, and Cognition course during your freshman year.  (Also I guess you have to apply first.  I'm getting ahead of myself, methinks) You'll know about four days into that course if neuroscience is for you. (And it totally is.)  That leaves approximately four more courses available in your schedule to take whatever else you want to take -- I repeat -- FOUR MORE COURSES. (Maybe three, if you're seriously hardcore and take all lab courses).  Though I'm not particularly familiar with the Political Science or IR program (though I'll bet if you peruse the forums a bit, you'll find someone who is), I have this sneaking suspicion that they have tons of awesome intro courses as well.

Worst-case-scenario?  You wind up being a double-major in two programs with great reputations at Hopkins.  And believe me, that's not such a bad case-scenario anyhow.

I'm not going to try to convince you to pick one major over another, because it's your brain, and you should put in it whatever you so choose.  But I will say that getting involved in the neuro major is super easy, and there's a huge support network with upperclassmen.  For instance, JHU_Noah leads NeuroJAYS meetings, (see the My Extracurriculars section, above) which is great, and he's also helping me get involved in neuroscience research.  In fact, thinking long-term, he might be a really good guy to ask about what being a neuro major and researcher is like.

Hopefully this helps a bit, let me know if you have other questions!

Thanks for visiting, can't wait to hear back!
JHU_Jordan
Jordan M.
Class of 2016

Neuroscience / Computer Science

Check out my blagoblag!

ysohn026

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Jordan - Succasunna, NJ
« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2013, 10:54 PM »
Hey Jordan!

I'm a junior this year in high school. I want to major in Neuroscience, and be on the Pre-med track! I have heard that the summer of your junior year is crucial to college applications, which is why I was considering what I should be doing? I have the possibility of working in a lab concerning neuroscience research or applying to Johns Hopkins's great summer university program!? I am having mondo concerns about which amazing opportunity is more lucrative to my college application and especially to show the university about how devoted I am in my desire to attend there?  Thanks so much.

JHU_Jordan

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Jordan - Succasunna, NJ
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2013, 06:20 PM »
Hey there, I'm glad to hear you're one of the wise individuals who knows that neuroscience is where it's at!

The summer of your junior year is crucial to the whole college-app process, but so is senior year and sophomore year and blah blah blah, point being -- don't get too worried about whether or not the program you're doing this summer is going to make the decision as to whether or not you're accepted. You should do what you really enjoy doing, or what you think you'll enjoy doing, because Hopkins loves to see that!

I actually spent my junior-year summer at a lab doing neuroscience research, and some of the things I learned there have carried over into my classes and NeuroJAYS discussions. It really helped me decide that, yes, I was interested in learning more about neuroscience and that I wanted to be a neuro major. If you're not totally sure that you're a neurosciencer, or you want to get some real-world experience, definitely go with the lab work.

Now, to play devil's advocate: Though I never participated in the JHU summer university program, I've heard wonderful things about it, and it gives you an idea of what Hopkins campus life is like. I think that this would be a great idea if you're not sure if Hopkins is right for you (it is) and it could help decide if you do actually want to apply next year (you do). There are neuroscience courses available, so that can factor into your decision as well.


I know that I just gave you two conflicting opinions, and, oh great, that's sooo helpful and all... But hopefully that gave you a bit more perspective. You can decide by asking yourself, are you more sure about wanting neuroscience as your major (then do Hopkins Summer U), or are you more sure about wanting to go to Hopkins (then check out that lab work!)? If you're planning on applying regular-decision, you'll have SOHOP, a springtime sleepover visitation program, to help you determine if you like Hopkins' campus. (You still get to go if you were an Early Decision'er, like I was... And it was still an awesome time. So don't worry about missing out!)




Now, off the record -- if I were you, I would go with the lab work. Having experience in the neuroscience field will help you even if you decide Hopkins isn't right for you, and no matter where you wind up, getting a lab position will be easier if you have previous experience to boast about in a resume.


Hopefully that helps, and I can't wait to see you on campus for some visits later this year!
JHU_Jordan
Jordan M.
Class of 2016

Neuroscience / Computer Science

Check out my blagoblag!

mdjr

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Jordan - Succasunna, NJ
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2013, 09:39 AM »
Although I've never seen the JHU campus, I'm really excited that my son was an ED admit into the BME program.  I'm trying to find the best way for us to see the campus in April.  It seems there is SOHOP and then "April visit" days for admitted students.  What is the difference?  It appears that SOHOP may be more crowded and may not give us as detailed a look at the campus.  Any input would be welcomed.
thanks in advance.

jr

JHU_Jordan

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Jordan - Succasunna, NJ
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2013, 10:06 AM »
jr,

Congratulations to you and your son -- the BME program is a tough one to get into, you must be so proud!
My answer to your visitation question is, of course, that you should come to campus for BOTH opportunities -- but if you have to pick just one, here's a quick comparison:

April visitation days are certainly less crowded, though they're not as new-student-centralized. That is, SOHOP, which is an overnight program designed to cram as much Hopkins-ness into 24 hours as possible, offers the SAC Fair (Student Activities Commission), where almost every club on campus sets up a booth on the Freshman Quad and talks to you about their programs, a carnival for admitted students at night, and then an opportunity to check out a lot of the dorm rooms (all experiences that the April visitation days don't generally have).

Pre-scheduled day visits are also awesome for the students, but kind of leave the parents to just mull about, which is fine since there's so much to eat and see and do around campus. Alternatively, SOHOP has programming for parents too -- of course, optional -- that talks about fun stuff like student programming during the year, different advantages to every major, some department presentations, and then the REALLY fun stuff like Financial Aid information sessions. This is all happening while the student is going to similar meetings, talking to Hopkins info-people (like me), eating at the FFC, and more.

If it were a one-or-the-other kind of deal for you, I'd say to drop the April day visit and come during SOHOP. It'll give your son a chance to meet other ED students in person and find some BME's who he'll become classmates with. It's certainly not too crowded, and it is really a day designed for the admitted student, rather than a regular day on campus that happens to include some extra admitted students walking around.

Either way you decide, I can't wait to see you on campus!
JHU_Jordan
Jordan M.
Class of 2016

Neuroscience / Computer Science

Check out my blagoblag!

mdjr

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Jordan - Succasunna, NJ
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2013, 10:25 AM »
Perfect!!!

appreciate the promptness.

jr

RjShi

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Jordan - Succasunna, NJ
« Reply #8 on: June 27, 2013, 08:44 PM »
Hey Jordan,

I was wondering what you thought about the Applied Chemical Equilibrium course. There's a good chance I might be taking it over orgo I because my pre-med advisors recommended it, but I am still not sure.

Thanks so much,
Richard

JHU_Jordan

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Jordan - Succasunna, NJ
« Reply #9 on: June 28, 2013, 01:08 PM »
Hey Richard!

So, first, I think I've gotta throw out a disclaimer; when I took this course, it was the first time it was being offered. We were guinea pigs in a lot of regards, and from what I learned from the second-semester-course-taker-folk-people, a few policies changed (for instance, they no longer offer personal helicopter rides to class. Bummer).

However, the course itself remained the same; it's a fantastic choice for students who have taken advanced chemistry courses in high school, but don't want to spend their first semester of college slaving away at organic chemistry.

A word of advice: You don't want to spend your first semester of college slaving away at organic chemistry.

Orgo is a tough course at Jops Hopchops. Like, tough tough. My (strong) suggestion would be to take Chem Eq; it reminded me of a lot of things I had forgotten from days of chem past, and it still gave me time to get up to some freshman shenanigans with my homies (or whatever it is those hip youngfolk like to say). There was a decent amount of homework (where 'decent' is used lightly), but the course itself was exceptionally helpful.

Counterpoint: A few of my friends were super gung-ho about starting orgo chem right away, and all of them are still alive and high-functioning (or, at least, no less functional than they were before), so if you're really feeling the orgo route, go for it, and more power to you! The truth is, either course will be a Hopkins-grade chemistry course which is all like AHH and then like AAHHH and then like AAAHHHH... but still totally doable.

Hope that helps (and is not too terrifying)!
Jordan
Jordan M.
Class of 2016

Neuroscience / Computer Science

Check out my blagoblag!

schen94

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Jordan - Succasunna, NJ
« Reply #10 on: July 15, 2013, 06:49 PM »
Hey Jordan! Your "Dorm Life" part rocks! I can't stop laughing reading it!
By the way, Wolman IS the best.
——Silin

dtchuindjo

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Jordan - Succasunna, NJ
« Reply #11 on: August 10, 2013, 09:45 AM »
Hey ,

I'm a junior in high school and I am also thinking about majoring in neuroscience and computer science. The field of Brain implants for repair and cosmetic purposes also interest me .You stated that you plan on going to medical school- why would you do that ? Why not just get a Phd in neuroscience and/or computer science ?  What's the reason behind going to medical school instead of getting  a Phd , in the field that you want to pursue ?

Thanks

JHU_Jordan

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Jordan - Succasunna, NJ
« Reply #12 on: August 10, 2013, 11:22 AM »
Yo yo yo wussup!

First of all, good work picking the two best majors in the ever of all! You will not be disappointed, Hopkins is definitely at the forefront of computerbrainy integration. (Prime example? The bionic-eye Argus II, over at the Lions Vision Institute. Check it out, it's more awesome than, say, having late-onset retinitis pigmentosa!)

The med-school / Ph.D. question is a good one, and it's not one I necessarily have an answer to just yet. One of the enticing points of medical school is that, while computer science changes daily, the human body stays roughly the same throughout the years (though — of course — what we know about it expands significantly). With a firm understanding of the body, it may be easier to apply fleeting technologies than to have to learn both the tech and the med. (Yes, this is, incidentally, just as good of an argument for Ph.D'ing it up in neuroscience. So sue me.)

I suppose my real response is this; I don't want to close off any options for myself, in case I get to senior year and realize that perhaps I want to go into cardiology or something. (Hey, stranger career-path changes have happened.) I'd rather take an extra course here or there — orgo chem? nbd — and have the option later, once I'm a grown-up, which I'm expecting to happen any day now.

Hopefully that answers your question, or at least doesn't un-answer your question!
JHU_Jordan
Jordan M.
Class of 2016

Neuroscience / Computer Science

Check out my blagoblag!

shrutz

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Jordan - Succasunna, NJ
« Reply #13 on: September 07, 2013, 04:55 AM »
 Hey Jordan ,

      I am an international student (Indian) and I aspire to become a neurosurgeon . I was thinking of persuing my education in JHU . But then a close relative (residing in US) informed me that a non- US citizen cannot become a neurosurgeon and JHU doesnot allow international students to persue a residency (in my case neuroscience) of their choice . Thus , the highest level of doctoral degree for a Non-US citizen is of a general physician .

      This information really shattered my dreams . I would be very grateful if you could confirm the originality of the fact and tell me more about the present-day scenario at JHU .

JHU_Jordan

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Jordan - Succasunna, NJ
« Reply #14 on: September 07, 2013, 01:19 PM »
Hey shrutz!

I can't speak for the medical institute's policies, because I'm only really familiar with undergraduate admissions (that's what this forum is intended for). However, from the best of my knowledge, that sounds totally ridiculous and I would be very surprised if it were true.

JHU — the undergraduate program, that is — certainly places no such restrictions on the studies of international students, and I would check with your relative to see where he got such information.

Hopefully that relieves some of your stress, let me know if you have any other questions!

JHU_Jordan
Jordan M.
Class of 2016

Neuroscience / Computer Science

Check out my blagoblag!

ipoma blanchard

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Jordan - Succasunna, NJ
« Reply #15 on: December 02, 2013, 06:09 AM »
bonjour jordan
je voulais demandez comment faire pour adhere dans votre université pour apprendre l'informatique de haut niveau comme toi


dtchuindjo

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Jordan - Succasunna, NJ
« Reply #16 on: December 03, 2013, 10:09 PM »
 ipoma blanchard I believe is asking you, what does he or she need to do in order to get into JHU and learn Computer Science at such a high level ( like yourself)?

Sorry for the intrusion, I just didn't know if you knew french

I wanted to ask you, how advance is your computer science department in relation to other schools? Is it possible to learn quantum computing and/or data mining as an undergrad at JHU? In other words the knowledge needed to build a complex and dynamic software. Computer science is difficult and can sometimes be very computer ( like many other classes), so how interactive are the teachers?

JHU_Jordan

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Jordan - Succasunna, NJ
« Reply #17 on: March 04, 2014, 05:21 PM »
Ah, my apologies Ipoma — I didn't see your post until today. I don't know french, but hopefully I can still answer your question (and maybe Google Translate will help)!

There is absolutely no required 'prerequisite' knowledge to be a computer science major here at Hopkins; you can come in knowing nothing, and the department will make sure you're up to speed and ready to go. Aside from having a great student CS lounge where you can always find other CS majors hanging out and coding (and there's always someone asking someone else how to write some algorithm or another; tons of social support!), the professors don't expect you to know anything beforehand; everything you need to know is in the curriculum (and anything else is just a bonus).



To dtchuindjo: First, thanks for the help! my french knowledge mostly stops at 'merci', so.... Merci. You've got a pretty interesting question so let's break it into a few parts: The first:

How advanced is the Johns Hopkins Computer Science Department in relation to other schools'?
Well, the short answer is, very. While you often hear that Johns Hopkins is home to some of the leading biotech computer scientists, it's also true that the JHU family boasts some names like Avi Ruben, Matthew Green, and many (MANY) more. Beyond that, the computer engineering department may have more of what you're looking for in terms of quantum computing — why not double-major?

Is it possible to learn quantum computing and/or data mining as an undergrad at JHU?
Oh, yes yes yes, and a million more yesses. I don't have any personal experience with quantum computing here because it doesn't quite fall in my specialty, but data mining (which is far closer to my major) is a very popular topic here; in fact, one of our program tracks is even called 'Big Data' and features this heavily.

How interactive are the teachers?
Virtually every esteemed university likes to pretend that their professors are approachable and interactive. Coming from the very communicative Hopkins community, it came as a bit of a shock to me when I learned that my friends at other schools rarely get the opportunity to talk one-on-one with their instructors.
Interesting fact #1: Every computer science class I've taken so far has been taught by a professor with a terminal degree in their field (i.e. they couldn't get a higher degree in their field even if they wanted to because they've already maxed out.)
Interesting fact #2: I am personally friendly with them as well; if they see me or I see them around campus, we wave and chat occasionally. Which is pretty awesome, and also, I've learned, rare in other schools.
Obviously chatting in passing isn't exactly what you meant (thought it's still awesome). In terms of talking to instructors or approaching them about classwork or questions, I've found every professor here approachable. Many of them even use programs like Piazza to be able to communicate, forum-style or chatroom-style, with students in case they run into questions. (I even briefly touch on that in my blog!) I've never (not even once) felt that I was unable to talk personally and honestly with an instructor.

Which is, as I might have mentioned before, pretty awesome.
Jordan M.
Class of 2016

Neuroscience / Computer Science

Check out my blagoblag!

delt@0115

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Jordan - Succasunna, NJ
« Reply #18 on: July 16, 2014, 08:40 AM »
Hey Jordan!

How are you?

I am currently a sophomore at kathmandu university, nepal. I am majoring in Human Biology. I am in interested on neuroscience and computer science. However, my university only allows to major in one program.
How is it like studying double major? I know it might look desperate to plan  far ahead, but I want to apply for computational neuroscience in John Hopkins for graduate program. As a student at john Hopkins what is your opinion on computational neuroscience?

Sincerely,
Aman

JHU_Jordan

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Jordan - Succasunna, NJ
« Reply #19 on: July 20, 2014, 01:13 PM »
Hey Aman!

I never thought Hopkins would be as active in computational neuroscience as it is; I assumed it was a relatively small community, and so I'd be lucky if I found someone working on a project that interested me directly. I was very mistaken! There are tons of really mind-blowing projects going on at both the University and the Medical Campus (School of Medicine, Hospital, etc) — though I can only speak about my own experiences.

Your message actually coincided with an email I received today: Hopkins just brought on a new faculty member -- Joshua Vogelstein -- who is doing some REALLY awesome work in neuro/CS. Obviously both his and other researchers' work speaks for itself, so I won't go too in-depth about that. But as a student who has been given the opportunity to work with a few of these professors, I can certainly say that computer-science + neuroscience at Hopkins is a very good program for undergraduates and graduate students alike. Hope to see you on campus soon!
Jordan M.
Class of 2016

Neuroscience / Computer Science

Check out my blagoblag!